Being indecisive on the AV issue

QUESTION

It’s voting day for me, and several others, in the UK. I normally vote pretty much the same way. In fact since I reached the age of having a democratic say I have only ever voted for one party. So, the decision on who to vote for is pretty easy, unless they begin to stand for some outrageous policy or ideology.

However, today we also get the chance to change our voting system. We have the option to change it from a ‘first past the post’ (most votes wins) to the ‘alternative vote’ system (where second, third and fourth preferences could be counted). It is all quite complicated, but the idea behind the AV system is that it gives a more reflective view of the general direction people want to go.

My fear though is that it will take votes away from the minor parties and hand them over to the major three. I say three because I have a feeling it will be the Liberal Democrats who benefit most from such a system, and not others like the Green party or some of the other less Compos mentis people who offer to serve the nation. So will it actually be fairer?

If it was a vote on Proportional Representation then I would have no hesitation voting yes. But that isn’t on offer. I do believe the current system is broken, but should I vote for the sake of change to another broken system?

Well, I need to make up my mind. Perhaps I’ll vote for one option as my preference and the other as my alternate.

Being Particular in a General Election

I was taking a walk around town the other day and I saw the current Member of Parliament out and about seeking re-election. It made me think about my whole view on politics. I have always voted for the same party, and, to the best of my knowledge, always will.

It isn’t because I agree with all their policies, most party’s policies change over the years. But I suppose I agree deep down with their ethos and principles. And as long as that is what their policies are based on I will continue to vote for them.

But, I would never join the party or become an activist for them. Is this due to some deep down generation x thing? Is it because I don’t agree with all their policies that I couldn’t toe the party line?

And.

Is it the same reason that drives me to state my religious affiliation as non-denominational on any forms I need to fill in?

Answers on a postcard or in the comments.

The other half (and isn’t he a socialist?)

I got to think (yes, I know, take it easy) about how the other half live. Take Peter Hain for instance. He’s got into a spot of bother for some donations that he may, or may not, have had given to him to use for his campaign to become deputy leader of the Labour party. When the water got a little too hot, he was able to tender his resignation, in order to ‘clear his name’.

Now, as I thought about things, I realised that he is in a slightly different position to myself. I certainly couldn’t resign my job in order to clear the contested parking ticket that I had unwittingly aquired. Or, gone on extended leave because there was a discrepancy with my tax credit form.

Political comment

Now I don’t claim to be as incisive as John Humphreys or Jeremy Paxman (or even Jeremy Clarkson) when it comes to political issues but I have watched the TV. On the way to work this morning I caught the radio talking about the US Presidential election and the first rounds of voting taking place today in Iowa. It said that the Republican favourite to take Iowa was Mike Huckabee, a former Baptist preacher. The reporter then made a political comment about Mr Huckabee that I found a little amusing, he said that he was weak on foreign policy. Now am I the only one who thinks that comment is a little ironic considering who the current repulican in charge is?